Home Security is easier – and Better- Than Ever

Think home security is still about bulky camera equipment and wires running all throughout your home? Think again.

Today, things have changed quite a bit, and the playing field has been leveled. Advanced tools and security systems are more accessible and affordable than ever. (And installing them might get you a discount on your homeowners insurance, too.)

Full-service systems are still a popular option with many people. Companies offer central monitoring, video surveillance, smoke/carbon monoxide detection and more. Some even include home automation tools so you can control appliances from anywhere, and many will send text-message alerts in response to specific occurrences, such as when the kids enter the house after school.

Do-it-yourselfers who don’t want an all-in-one system have many choices as well. Here are three of the newest and most popular security tools:

1. Smart (and small) cameras

Cameras today can be tucked anywhere and don’t require wires. With a good battery and wi-fi connection, you can see what’s happening outside — or inside — with a glance at your phone or computer.

2. Key-free doors

Say you have a friend stopping by to check on your dog while you’re gone for the day. You don’t have to risk leaving a key outside. With a code-based entry system, you can simply provide your friend with temporary access that turns on and off when you want.

3. Home automation products

It’s easier than you think to give yourself remote access to the lights and appliances in your home. At least one available product can be used with your existing power outlets; simply plug it in and control the power to that outlet from an app on your smartphone. Don’t ever worry about forgetting to leave a light on again.

Of course, even “old-school” tools, such as motion-activated outdoor lights, can still have a big impact on security. So whether you choose high-tech tools or stick to the basics, you’ll be making your home here a less attractive target for burglars.

Movie Claim Monday Injuries

Movie Claim MondayFor this month’s movie claim Monday we wanted to share a list of actors injured on set. On site job injuries are usually paid through the company workers comp policy. This list does not specify if a claim was made or of any kind of pay out. We just imagine these instances would be covered losses.

 

 

19 Times That Actors Have Been Injured On Set

Sometimes, the show really must go on. They may play larger-than-life characters on screen, but actors are human and sometimes get the short end of the stick when it comes to on-set injuries. Here are 19 times where big stars were in the wrong place at the wrong time. 1.

 

 

 

A Look Back At The Month of June

month-of-june

In the month of June, Brown & Brown Insurance of New Mexico co-hosted two events. On June 15th the Dental Lunch & Learn was held at the Northern Italian Grill, where we had the pleasure of having guest speaker Dr. Pino with Pino Periodontics discuss topics regarding todays dental technology and helpful tips and advice for oral care.
On Thursday, June 23rd the Wildfire Prevention Event was held at the Albuquerque Country Club. Chubb Insurance presented services they provide for the Wildfire Defense Services. Attendees also viewed a live demonstration of the effects of Thermo-Gel when applied to a dwelling. Visit our blog for more information and pictures of the events.
Below are some other blogs you may find helpful from the month of June.

Home Inventory

Firework Pet Safety

Dogs and Umbrella Insurance

RV Campsites

 

Renting your home

Home Inventory

Why a Home Inventory Is Important

 

Let’s try a little exercise: Can you list everything you own from memory? Didn’t think so.Home Inventory

 

The fact is most people own more things than they realize. It’s easy to remember the cars, the computer, the TV. But what about that holiday china in the garage?  Or every pair of shoes?

 

All of it is regarded as personal property for insurance purposes. And if your home is destroyed by fire or some other disaster, having a list of your possessions makes filing a claim easier — and helps you put your life back together.

 

Why should I complete a home inventory? What’s the best way?

Comparing the value of your belongings to the “contents” limit listed in your policy helps you make sure you have enough insurance to replace them if they are lost, stolen or destroyed as a result of a covered loss. The easiest way to take an inventory is to use a video camera, recording and describing items as you walk through your house. Or, you can use a regular camera and create a home inventory checklist.

 

Here are a few tips for completing and storing your inventory:

Add brand names and descriptions where you can, especially on large-ticket items. Serial numbers are helpful to note.

Keep any receipts you have with the list to make the claims process easier.

Store your video or photo inventory offsite so you won’t lose it if your house is damaged.

Update your personal property records when you purchase new furnishings and valuables.

Though the task may seem daunting, it’s important to try. An incomplete inventory is better than nothing at all.

 

How much insurance do I need?

We can assist you in analyzing your insurance needs and help you decide how to most effectively protect your personal property. You should consider full-value coverage, which will pay for the replacement value of your personal belongings. A standard policy typically covers personal property only up to its actual cash value, determined by taking the replacement cost and deducting depreciation, which can be substantial. (For example, a 5-year-old TV is usually worth much less than what it would cost to purchase a new one.)

 

Finally, remember your homeowners policy covers valuable items such as jewelry, furs, art and antiques, only up to set dollar amounts. If the cost of replacing them exceeds these limits, you may want to purchase scheduled personal property coverage.

 

The Insurance Information Institute has a FREE online tool that can help you create your inventory. Just visit www.knowyourstuff.org for more details.

 

We hope you’ll never need the home inventory, but preparing for the worst can prevent a lot of hassle later!

 

 

 

Where the accidents are: What NOT to do on the road

22185094_SWant to be a better driver? Take a look at the three most common types of at-fault auto claims. These are claims in which the driver is to blame for the accident. This list, compiled by Claims Journal magazine, is a great guide to what NOT to do while you’re on the road:

Out-of-lane collisions. Out-of-lane collisions are the No. 1 at-fault auto claim. That’s when you try to change lanes at the same time another vehicle is trying to do the same thing and the two cars collide. Most often, they are caused by drivers paying attention more to what’s going on inside their car than what is happening on the road. Looking in the back seat, fiddling with your car’s stereo, calling someone on your cell phone, eating, having an argument with a passenger, all can take your attention away from safe driving. ‘Inattention’ is the leading cause of out-of-lane collisions, according to industry data.

Single-vehicle collisions. The second most common at-fault accident is a single-vehicle collision. That’s when a driver skids off the road or out of their lane and collides with a fence, tree, house or anything other than another car. The top reason for these types of accidents is driving too fast for weather conditions. You’ll want to drive more slowly during snowy, icy and rainy weather. Many drivers don’t.

Rear-end collisions. Rear-end collisions are the third most common at-fault accidents, and these types of crashes are often caused by tailgating, or driving too close behind another vehicle. Under normal driving conditions, it’s recommended drivers should maintain at least one car length back for every 10 miles of driving speed. So, if someone is driving 50 miles per hour, keep at least five car lengths behind. When the weather is bad, you’ll want to maintain even more space between you and other drivers.

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